July – Day 9: Agility Meets Stability

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Our machine has to be stable and agile if it’s going to run long and strong.

Strength and stability go hand is hand so our consistent strength work helps us build stability in our core which includes our entire abdominal region and our hips and glutes.

Agility is our body’s ability to be quick, graceful, and nimble. It is how effectively and efficiently we can move, change direction and the position of our body while maintaining control.

When agility meets stability we improve more than just out athletic performance, we also move better day-to-day. This can keep us from rolling an ankle or tweaking our back from a silly jolt or quick movement. A small amount of stability and agility training will make a big difference in our balance and strength!

Not convinced yet? Here are 5 reasons why taking the time to build stability and agility is so important.

  1. Injury Prevention – Many injuries happen when the body falls out of alignment in motion. Think of pulling the muscles in your lower back if you lift from an improper position, or tearing the ligaments in your knee if you misstep. Agility training increases balance, control and flexibility, allowing the body to maintain proper posture and alignment. This helps keep sensitive areas like our shoulders, lower back and knees protected while we are moving quickly.
  2. The Mind-Body Connection – Stability and agility training helps build pathways in the brain for fast responses to various stimuli. At first, the movements will seem forced, but as we practice more, they become more natural to us.
  3. Improved Balance and Coordination – Ever watched a gymnast on a balance beam? Her movements are dynamic, fluid and perfectly balanced. Agility and stability training encourages the body to develop balance in the midst of dynamic movement, much like the gymnast on the beam. Practicing quick starts and stops, hand-eye coordination and speed help the body work smoothly as a whole which makes our movements more fluid!
  4. Improved Recovery Time – Sometimes an intense workout can leave us with sore muscles and decreased energy levels the next couple days. But the busts of movement involved in stability and agility training helps us build strength in our musculoskeletal system, which can shorten recovery time.
  5. Increased Results in Minimal Time – Often agility and stability drills are HIIT (High Intensity Training) type of workouts. These types of workouts can produce noticeable results in a minimal amount of time. The non-linear movements engage a greater number of muscles then when we are running in a straight line. Engaging more muscles translates into better results!

It doesn’t take long and as promised, today’s workout is only around 14 minutes. With so many benefits coming from such a short amount of work, why would you make excuses?

You won’t…cause this is No Stats and No Excuses July…work your way through this stamina, stability and agility workout and let’s build on our ability to move smoothly!

Day 9 exercises:

  • Fitness Blender Sports Endurance Workout – Stamina, Stability and Agility
  • Plank & Wall Sit – :60 each (minimum)

Bonus: Clam Workout Video (2.5 minute per leg) – Adding this workout helps us build strength in our hips and glutes but we also get the added bonus of a good stretch. I’ve noticed that when I do this workout, I feel looser then before I did it!

Fitness Blender Sports Endurance Workout – Stamina, Stability and Agility

Clam Workout Video

Just a quick reminder (not that any of us can forget) but…

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